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Wednesday, 6 February 2013

David Steven,s Design Day


Wednesday 22nd May 2013 We enjoyed a fabulous Garden Design with David Stevens






INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE

This Course can only be a ‘taster’! – But I will take you right the way through the sequence of just how to design a garden, the pitfalls, the ‘tricks of the trade’ and the practical commonsense things that will make your garden work for you. We shall cover both theory and practice, the latter in the Garden Centre seeing just what plants we can choose for a whole range of situations, soil and microclimate – enjoy!!

Your role during the course and how to get maximum benefit.

1 What is a Garden design
2 What is a Designers job
3 What you should expect from a Designer

THE BASIS OF GOOD GARDEN DESIGN

Wherever you live in any part of the World the PRINCPLES of design remain the same.  This is to do with the manipulation of space, plants come later and that is perhaps the most important lesson of all.

1 It cannot be separated from other design
The Masters: Frank Lloyd Wright
Lutyens
Mackintosh etc
2 Reflects YOUR personality
3 Reflects house AND  LOCALITY
4 Responsibility to your neighbours
5 House/Garden and landscape cannot be separated
6 The garden has to contain practical AND beautiful

Do not copy fashion
Do not copy from books/TV/shows etc.

While most of us can design our homes the ideas dry up outside – why?

THE SIMPLE THINGS WORK BEST

ANALYSIS – WHAT HAVE YOU GOT/WHAT DO YOU WANT

What have you got – Learning to know your garden – analyse – survey and the birth of ideas.  Don’t slash and burn

What do you want – Moodboard, checklist, priorities

The importance of and how to prepare a scale drawing.

Budgets

Degree of Maintenance

GARDEN DESIGN PRINCIPLES

The importance of an indigenous design style – and your personality
Don’t just copy Rosemary Verey (although she was brilliant) or anybody else

The importance of Inspiration from whatever source – always take a camera and notebook – everywhere

Borrowed landscape – within and without

TENSION/ MYSTERY/ SURPRISE

The subdivision and manipulation of space which is the basis of all good design.


GARDEN STYLES – AND WHICH WILL SUIT YOU

You don’t have to conform to a given style (ie) English, Japanese, Country Cottage etc., although you might incorporate one of these.


You can choose your own style from  (THERE ARE ONLY FOUR)
Formal (balanced)Asymmetric (informal)

Freeform (fluid)
Deconstructivist (breaks the rules!)

DON’T BE AFRAID OF RECTANGLES

DIFFERENT GARDEN SHAPES

The importance of positive and negative space
The importance of the diagonal line
The right angle rule
The question of curves

PREPARING AN OUTLINE SCHEME

Choose a garden style (simplicity)
Don’t crystallise too soon
Keep it loose
Try different version

PLANTING


The English/ AND other styles

Don’t necessarily copy any particular style – but take the best as long as it suits you and your micro-climate.

Reflect an Identity in planting
A worthwhile style that uses a blend of textures, shapes and colours with a subtle mix of indigenous and exotic species.

You will have checked out your micro climate/prevailing winds etc. – make the most of local knowledge.

SOIL, CULTIVATION AND COMPOST!!!!!!!!

BUILDING UP THE PLANTING PLAN LIKE A WOODLAND


1 THE OUTER FRAMEWORK – (ones, twos, threes) largely evergreen, tough screening, higher + trees.

2 THE MIDDLE GROUND – Lower, more colourful, variation in height, shape, texture etc, three, five, seven (mix shrubs – perennials)

3 THE LOWER STORY – GROUND COVERS – big drifts, foliage or colour.

4 THE FOCAL POINT PLANTS – (careful or will become spotty)

The theory of REVERSAL planting

THE USE OF COLOUR


Colour grading (or how to throw away the colour wheel!)

Hot attracts
Cools recede
How to link colour ranges by using grey/cream etc.
“lifting “colour ranges by cross fertilisation


RESEARCH PLANTING CONDITIONS

Remember that there can be different micro-climatic conditions within your immediate locality area or even your garden.

Understand temperate or other climatic zone you live in

Research areas of micro climates i.e., courtyards, seaside, hillsides etc.

Know your planting areas ie North/South facing walls within the garden infra structure and subsequent climatic conditions within those areas.


SUMMING UP AND QUESTIONS!








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